Angling


Angling Good Practice Guide

Guidance for terrestrial angling including wading and ocean facing rock fishing.

Version 1.0 | Date 23 Sept 2019 | Details: Version one release.


Acknowledgment, disclaimer and preface

Acknowledgment, disclaimer and preface
Traditional owner acknowledgement

The Outdoor Council of Australia and the Australian AAS Steering Committee would respectfully like to acknowledge the Traditional Owners, their Elders past, present and emerging, for the important role Indigenous people continue to play in Australia and most especially on the land and waters used for outdoor activities and recreation.

Disclaimer

Copyright
Copyright 2019 Outdoor Council of Australia.

Disclaimer
The information published in the Australian Adventure Activity Standard (AAAS) and accompanying Good Practice Guides (GPG’s), including this document, is for information purposes only and is not a substitute for, or intended to replace, independent, professional or legal advice. The information contained in the Australian Adventure Activity Standard and the Good Practice Guides are a guide only. Activity providers and any other person accessing the documentation should consider the need to obtain any appropriate professional advice relevant to their own particular circumstances, including the specific adventure activities and needs of the dependent participants.

The information published in the Australian Adventure Activity Standard and Good Practice Guides are subject to change from time to time. Outdoor Council of Australia gives no warranty that the information is current, correct or complete and is not a definitive statement of procedures. Outdoor Council of Australia reserves the right to vary the content of the Australian Adventure Activity Standard and/or Good Practice Guides as and when required. Activity providers should make independent inquiries as to the correctness and currency of the content and use their own skill and care with respect to their use of the information.

The Australian Adventure Activity Standard and Good Practice Guides do not replace any statutory requirements under any relevant State and Territory legislation and are made available on the express condition that Outdoor Council of Australia together with the authors, consultants, advisers and the Australian Adventure Activity Standard Steering Committee members who assisted in compiling, drafting and ratifying the documents:

  • are not providing professional or legal advice to any person or organisation; and
  • are not liable for any loss resulting from an action taken or reliance made on any information or material contained within the Australian Adventure Activity Standard, Good Practice Guides and associated documents.
Preface
Forward

“Adventure is worthwhile” – Aristotle

The Australian Adventure Activity Standard and Good Practice Guides are designed to ensure effective, responsible, sustainable and safe delivery of adventure activities to dependent participants. They can help people across the outdoor sector to develop appropriately managed adventure activities which enhance individuals and our communities, while protecting the environment and culturally significant places. In doing this, these documents can help ensure that people will continue to enjoy the benefits of adventure activities well into the future.

Best wishes for all your adventures.

The Australian Adventure Activity Standard Steering Committee.

About these documents

The Australian Adventure Activity Standard (AAAS) and related Good Practice Guides (GPG’s) are a voluntary good-practice framework for safe and responsible planning and delivery of outdoor adventure activities with dependent participants.

The AAAS and related GPG’s provide guidance on safety and other aspects of responsible activity delivery, such as respect for the environment, cultural heritage and other users. They are not a full legal compliance guide, nor are they a “how to” guide or field manual for outdoor activities. They do not provide guidance on providing a high-quality experience over and above safe and responsible delivery.

Activity providers are encouraged to obtain independent professional and legal advice in relation to their obligations and duties in delivering adventure activities and should reference the relevant laws to the area in which they intend to undertake the adventure activity.

Does the Standard and Good Practice Guides apply to me?

The AAAS and related GPG’s are specifically designed to help activity providers who are conducting activities involving dependent participants, to provide a safe and responsible experience. It is for each provider to determine based on their own individual circumstances, if they are working with dependent participants or not.

A dependent participant is a person owed a duty of care by the activity provider who is reliant upon the activity leaders for supervision, guidance or instruction to support the person’s participation in an activity. For example, this often includes participants under the age of 18, participants lacking the ability to safely undertake the activity, or participants reasonably relying on the activity provider for their safety. The degree of dependence may vary during an activity.

Considerations for determining if a person is a dependent participant may include, but is not limited to:

  • the foreseeable level of competence of the participant in the activity and the associated level of reliance this creates on the activity leaders
  • the level of foreseeable self-reliance of the participant to reasonably manage their own safety
  • the possible variation throughout the activity of the level of reliance
  • the variation of the degree of dependence throughout the activity
  • the individual context, nature and circumstances of the activity
  • the relevant circumstances and particular facts relating to the responsibilities assumed by the provider.

An activity provider can be any organisation – business, community group, government agency, school or any other groups – that organises and leads adventure activities. Individuals can also be an activity provider, if they have the ultimate legal duty of care to participants. In general, ‘the Standard’ and GPG’s relate to a provider as a ‘whole organisation’, rather than to ‘specific roles’ within the provider ‘organisation’.

Some providers may have their own standards or guidelines appropriate to their duty of care. It is recommended that these be reviewed periodically to ensure current duty of care expectations are met. ‘The Standard’ and ‘GPG’s’ may aid such reviews.

Are they legally binding?

The AAAS and GPG’s are voluntary, not legal requirements. However, they may refer to specific laws and regulations which may be legally binding on activity providers.

While the AAAS and ‘GPG’s’ are voluntary, some land managers and other organisations may require compliance. This may be as a condition of obtaining a licence, permit or other permission, or some other condition (e.g. a contract).

Under Australian common law and relevant legislation, providers have a legal duty of care towards dependent participants in some circumstances. In broad terms, the legal duty requires providers to take reasonable care that their actions and omissions do not cause reasonably foreseeable injury to dependent participants.

The AAAS and GPG’s are not legal advice, and they cannot answer whether a legal duty exists in specific circumstances. All adventure activity providers should check what legal requirements apply in their own situation and seek legal advice if at all in doubt.

Even in cases where participants are not dependent, other legal duties and obligations may arise. The AAAS and GPG’s have not been developed for those contexts.

Structure of the Standard and Good Practice Guides

The AAAS (i.e. the Standard) has a related Core Good Practice Guide (Core GPG). They both include guidance that applies to all adventure activities. They set out recommendations for a common approach to risk management that can generally apply regardless of the specific activity being undertaken.

Individual activity Good Practice Guides include guidance on specific adventure activities.

Shows how the Standard, Core good practice guide and activity good practice guides fit together.s

For any given activity, (i) the AAAS (the Standard), (ii) the Core GPG and (iii) the activity Good Practice Guide that applies to that specific activity, should be consulted.

The AAAS and Core GPG cover only those activities specifically listed. While the AAAS and Core GPG may be useful in managing risk generally for other activities, they may not reflect good practice for such other activities.

Interpretation of the Standard and Good Practice Guides

The following words and phrases are used in all documents and have specific meanings:

  • Must: used where a provision is mandatory, if the provider is to operate fully in accordance with AAAS or GPG’s. (This is equivalent to the keyword “shall” used in other voluntary standards e.g. Standards Australia, other International Standards Organisations (ISO’s) etc.)
  • Should: used where a provision is recommended, not mandatory. It indicates that the provider needs to consider their specific situation and decide for themselves whether it applies or is relevant.
  • Can/cannot: indicates a possibility and capability.
  • May/need not: indicates a permission or existence of an option.
  • But are/is not limited to: used to indicate that a list is not definitive and additional items may need to be considered depending on the context.

The following formatting is used throughout:

  • Defined words are in italics. They are defined in the Glossary.
  • Examples are in smaller italic 9-point font.
  • In document references are in underlined. References are to section heading titles.
  • External web or Australian AAS & GPG document links are in dotted underline italic.
Creation

The AAAS and GPG’s were developed with the input from a wide range of outdoors and adventure activity experts with extensive field experience. They draw on state and territory-specific standards previously in place across Australia. The development process included work by a range of technical expert working groups, as well as open consultation throughout the community of activity providers and other experts.

The Steering Committee wishes to thank all the Technical Working Group (TWG) members for their work and contributions.

The Steering Committee acknowledges all the State and Territory Governments for funding the creation of the first national adventure activity standard and set of good practice guides for the sector.

Further details of the creation of the AAAS and GPG’s can be found at australianaas.org.au/about/history/

It is intended that the AAAS and GPG’s will be regularly updated to reflect changing practice and better understanding over time. Updates will be noted on the website www.australianaas.org.


1 Introduction

1.1 Angling

Angling is a method of fishing using a hook. There are many angling methods and types of equipment which may be used in association with hooks and line. It may be undertaken in fresh or saltwater. Freshwater angling environments may include dams, lakes, rivers, billabongs, waterholes and streams. Saltwater angling environments may include bays, estuaries, inlets, beaches and the ocean.

The type of location in which angling can be undertaken include:

  • terrestrial angling (e.g. angling from land, beach, bank or land structure such as a jetty)
  • angling while partly immersed in the water (e.g. wading)
  • angling from a watercraft (e.g. paddle-craft, motorboat, floating aid or device etc.)
  • angling on ocean facing environments (e.g. rocks) – see discussion below.

This Good Practice Guide (GPG) does cover hand gathering (including bait), scoop/dip netting and ocean facing rock fishing.

1.2 Ocean facing rock fishing

Ocean facing rock fishing is angling from rock ledges, submerged rocks, rock faces and rocks, or gaining access via sandbars or mudflats that interface the water and are subject to wave action, tide variation and/or inundation. ‘Rock fishing’ is the common term for ocean facing rock fishing. As ‘fishing from rocks’ can also occur in a range of environments with different hazards and risks, ‘ocean facing rock fishing’ is used to distinguish the particular type of environment involved.

Ocean facing rock fishing is potentially dangerous with several deaths occurring every year due to slipping or being swept into the ocean. It can be extremely difficult to mitigate the possibility of and offer a suitable immediate emergency rescue response if anyone or a group of people slip, fall or are washed into the ocean while ocean facing rock fishing.

Ocean facing rock fishing must only be conducted with dependent groups where thorough and proper risk management plan are implemented and maintained.

1.3 Exclusions and related activities

1.3.1 Exclusions

Activities that are not covered by this GPG are:

  • competition or championship angling events
  • fishing tackle hire and boat hire
  • use of watercraft while angling (see discussion below in 1.3.2 Angling and watercraft)
  • transport used to the site (e.g. using 4-wheel drives)
  • swimming
  • net fishing (except landing nets which may be used to assist anglers land fish caught by line and hand scoop nets for prawning)
  • spear fishing and hand gathering by snorkelling or diving
  • use of traps and pots for fishing except where it is in “inland waters” (e.g. yabbies)
  • artificial bait and berley making
  • forms of fishing deemed illegal by state regulatory authorities
  • angling activities at sites that require a fall from height safety system (e.g. fall from height harness and anchoring system)
  • making sinkers
  • activities associated with camping while on overnight or extended activities (see Camping GPG)
  • bushwalking to a site (see Bushwalking GPG).

1.3.2 Angling and watercraft

This GPG does not cover the hazards and risks associated with use of watercraft (e.g. paddle-craft, motorboat, sailing boat, etc.) while angling.

Refer Appendix 3 Watercraft use information sources for further information.


2 Management of risk

Refer to the Core Good Practice Guide – Management of risk.


3 Planning

3.1 Activity plans

Angling planning considerations should include:

  • items in the Core GPG – Activity plans
  • the type of location(s) and remoteness
  • location environment hazards and risks
  • the weather and forecast weather
  • the potential wildlife encountered
  • environmental sustainability practice for the area and fish species involved
  • supervision required
  • land manager and/or land owner requirements
  • activity purpose
  • participant considerations including general ability as per the participant section and angling ability
  • activity leader competencies
  • location access requirements
  • laws and regulation
  • other potential visitors and users
  • details of all the locations that may be used for the activity
  • ways to provide a positive experience for participants
  • food and water requirements
  • toileting and hygiene
  • possible extreme weather
  • equipment requirements
  • closed seasons and restrictions for species and locations
  • clean-up and waste disposal
  • navigation equipment required
  • emergency management plan
  • travel plans and managing fatigue.

Where targeted fish species are identified, then a plan and related procedure may be needed to enable it to be caught in an effective and sustainable manner.

3.2 Emergency management planning

Considerations when developing emergency management plans should include but is not limited to:

  • items in the Core GPG -Emergency management planning
  • a non-participating contact being part of the emergency management plan
  • types of emergencies the risk assessment plan identifies
  • remoteness of the activity and access to communications
  • treatment where impaled by a fishing hook
  • treatment for injury from marine creatures
  • context appropriate water rescues, how they will be performed and practiced periodically
  • the need for activity intentions plan in accordance with any land manager, marine safety agency or non- participant contact needs
  • the likely response time of marine rescue, land rescue or surf lifesaving services at the time of the activity
  • escape if water levels change
  • the need for an Automated External Defibrillator (AED).

Where there is only one activity leader:

  • the emergency management plan must have arrangements that allow participants an adequate and appropriate communication system if the activity leader becomes incapacitated
  • participants must be aware of the location and the detail of the emergency management plan if the activity leader becomes incapacitated.

Also refer Core GPG – Emergency management planning.

3.3 Modification or cancellation of activities

The management of hazards and risks associated at each location that is likely to be used must be subject to a risk assessment and activity plan.

Risks and hazards associated with moving between locations should be addressed in the risk assessment and activity plan.

Where modification or cancellations of activities are not addressed by the activity plan, any modification should remain at or below the level of risk of the original planned activity.

Modifications to or cancellation of the activity may require notification to:

  • land owner(s)/land manager(s)/marine protected area manager(s)/marine safety agency
  • non-participant contact
  • surf or marine rescue agencies.


4 Participants

4.1 Information provided pre-activity to participants

Participant pre-activity communication considerations should include but are not limited to:

  • those found in Core GPG – Pre-activity communication
  • licencing and permit requirements
  • allergy considerations (including allergies to marine life)
  • clothing and equipment requirements that they need to provide and what is provided to them.

Additional participant pre-activity communication information for ocean facing rock fishing must include:

  • hazards and risks, including risks of waves
  • history of ocean facing rock fishing deaths
  • requirement relating to safety equipment that is to be used
  • swimming, fitness or other skill requirements.

Additional participant pre-activity communication information for angling that involves wading must include:

  • hazards and risks
  • requirement relating to safety equipment that is to be used
  • swimming, fitness or other skill requirements
4.2 Participant considerations

Participant considerations should include:

  • allergies considerations (including to marine life)
  • provisions found in Core GPG – Participants section.
4.3 Participant restrictions

A participant may not be able to participate in an angling activity for regulatory or safety reasons.

Reasons a participant may not be able to participate may include, but are not limited to:

  • not holding appropriate permits, licenses or relevant exemptions
  • inability to meet client organisation or providers swimming, fitness or other skills requirements
  • for high risk activities such as ocean facing rock fishing, the inability to meet any client organisation or providers age restrictions
  • lack of previous experience using certain types of terminal tackle outfits
  • lack of specific casting experience or knowledge
  • other considerations listed in the Core GPG – Participant restrictions.

5 Environment

5.1 Environment related planning

5.1.1 Environment considerations

Environmental considerations may include but are not limited to:

  • the type and features of the waterbody used for the activity
  • type of equipment needed for the type of activity and environment
  • hazards present or likely to be present at the site
  • the terrain at the site and access (e.g. steep slopes, uneven or unstable footing, cliff edges, undercut banks etc.)
  • ocean facing rock fishing environment considerations (see section 5.1.6 below)
  • weather conditions and forecast conditions (see section 5.3 below)
  • (see section 5.1.2 below)
  • if it is daytime or night-time
  • other water users
  • land manager, traditional owner and/or land owner requirements
  • any marine safety agency laws or regulations
  • the type of flora expected (e.g. impeding progress, ability to cut or scratch etc.)
  • the fauna expected (see section 5.9 Safety while interacting with wildlife below)
  • environmental sustainability procedures (see section 5.10 below).

5.1.2 Water conditions

Water considerations may include but is not limited to:

  • wave and swell conditions
  • effects of tide, tide variances and currents
  • water temperature
  • water flow rate, levels and depth
  • river hazards (see Glossary)
  • water quality (see section 5.1.3 below)
  • wakes from boat users.

5.1.3 Water quality

Water quality may include visual clarity, floating debris, pollutants and water borne diseases.

Areas must be avoided, where visual indicators or a current warning notification or signage identifies the water is polluted or contaminated and may pose a risk to human health via direct contact or eating the catch.

Areas should be avoided, where the water is likely to be polluted or contaminated and may pose a risk to human health via direct contact or eating the catch.

Polluted or contaminated water may include water impacted by:

  • chemicals
  • sewage
  • upstream runoff (e.g. urban runoff such as oil from roads, industrial operations etc.)
  • waterborne microorganisms:
    • microbial or bacteria (e.g. E.coli)
    • protozoa (e.g. Gardia)
    • cyanobacteria (e.g. blue-green algae)
    • viruses (e.g. hepatitis)
  • animal waste or carcases
  • rubbish or floating debris.

5.1.4 Weather information

Appropriate sources must be used for:

  • current and forecast weather and water conditions (refer Appendix 1 Weather information)
  • current and forecast weather warnings (refer Appendix 1 Weather information).

5.1.5 Water conditions information

Sources of water conditions information to assess the suitability of the water body for the activity should include but is not limited to:

  • the Bureau of Meteorology relevant information
  • local information sources (e.g. water gauges, dam operators, marine safety agencies, local organisations etc.)
  • tide charts
  • warning signs or information at the site
  • inspection of the site.

5.1.6 Ocean facing rock fishing considerations

Ocean facing rock fishing considerations must include:

  • local area signage and warnings in place
  • the regular height waves & swell reach up onto the rocks
  • how sloping and slippery the rock surface is
  • if falls from height are possible (e.g. cliffs)
  • safety equipment required for that environment (e.g. life jackets, anchor points, etc.)
  • emergency management requirements for that environment.

The following information on assessing wave risks should be considered:

5.2 Marine safety, landowner/manager and traditional owner requirements

5.2.1 Marine safety and landowner/manager requirements

Procedures must be used to determine and comply with all relevant marine safety agency and land manager/land owner requirements.

Land managers or land owners may include:

  • a national marine safety agency
  • marine safety agencies in the jurisdiction of operation
  • harbour masters in port jurisdictions
  • marine authorities
  • marine national parks/national park authorities
  • marine sanctuary authorities
  • local waterway managers (e.g. water catchment authorities, local councils or shires)
  • private land/water body owners (e.g. private dams).

Also refer to the Core GPG – Land owner and/or manger requirements.

5.2.2 Traditional owner requirements

Procedures should be used to determine and comply with any traditional owner and cultural heritage requirements.

Also refer the Core GPG – Traditional owners and cultural heritage.

5.3 Weather & other trigger points

5.3.1 Weather trigger points

Trigger points must be based on the relevant Bureau of Meteorology weather warnings and actual weather conditions.

The risk management plan and emergency management plan should include guidance on relevant trigger points and associated actions for:

  • extreme cold temperature
  • snow and ice
  • extreme hot temperatures
  • lightning
  • heavy rain
  • strong winds
  • severe weather warnings
  • thunderstorm warnings
  • flood and/or flash flood warnings
  • tropical cyclone advice: watch and warnings
  • coastal situations:
    • hazardous surf warnings
    • tsunami: watch and warnings
    • marine wind warnings.

5.3.2 Non weather trigger points

The risk management plan and emergency management plan may include guidance on relevant non-weather trigger points and associated actions for but not limited to:

  • strong currents and water release rate from dams or industry
  • presence of marine stingers, drifting objects and other water hazards
  • presence of people hazards (e.g. other anglers, vessels, swimmer or other non-anglers)
  • blue green algae or water pollution level
  • poor air quality or visibility (e.g. reduced distance due to fog, low light levels, smoke or certain particulate levels)
  • bushfires
  • riverbed or sea floor (bathymetry) conditions or changes
  • swell period, direction, consistency, size and intensity.

5.3.3 Response to trigger points

Actions for trigger points may include but are not limited to:

  • cancellation of activity
  • postponing the activity
  • move to a safe location or alternate area
  • avoid locations effected by tides or surf
  • avoiding areas that have the potential for flooding or flash flooding
  • preparations to avoid the risks associated with lightning
  • preparations to avoid the risks associated with blizzards
  • moving to areas that are protected from strong winds and/or hail
  • managing risks of flying or falling items during strong winds.
5.4 Bushfire, prescribed fire and fire danger

Refer Core GPG – Bush fire, prescribed fire and fire danger.

5.5 Lightning

When thunder is audible, a suitable location should be sort, to wait out the thunderstorm.

Considerations for locations to waiting out the thunderstorm should include but not limited to avoiding:

  • being on or in the water (e.g. wading, etc.)
  • using fishing equipment that may act like a lightning rod
  • being on high structures
  • touching metal structures, cable or equipment
  • being on the highest ground in the area
  • tall trees or structures that may act like a lightning rod
  • water saturated ground near watercourses
  • locations where group is unable to spread out
  • caves
5.6 Flooding

Procedures should address hazards and risks posed when angling in areas subject to:

  • increases in water level caused by rainfall upstream
  • tidal inundation
  • intermittent water release from dams or industrial processes
  • a flood warning.

The crossing of swollen creeks, rivers, flooded bridges or fords, or the entry of floodwaters should be avoided.

Areas likely to experience flash flooding should be avoided during heavy rainfall, severe weather that could lead to flooding or thunderstorms. (Also see Appendix 1.1 Warnings.)

5.7 Assessing water entry or crossings

When assessing the suitability of a potential water entry or crossing, consideration should be given but is not limited to:

  • type of water flow (e.g. river flow, estuary, tidal movement, wave action, etc.)
  • if the water is still or moving
  • how cold is the water and the risk of hypothermia
  • if there is debris floating or flowing in the current
  • how clear the water is and if the base can be seen
  • the depth of moving water as this can indicate the amount of water and force needed to be overcome to avoid being washed away
  • the speed of the water as this can indicate the volume of water and force needed to be overcome to avoid being washed away
  • where the water flows to, as the flow may wash people into dangerous situations (e.g. washed out to sea, river hazards like into trees in the water that act as strainers, into narrow rock crevices)
  • the base of the crossing (e.g. pebbles, sand, small rocks or large rocks) as moving water can move the base increasing the danger of foot entrapment and/or reducing the likelihood of maintaining stable footing
  • slippery surfaces that need to be crossed
  • sinking into mud.

See section 7.7.8 Managing entry into water for management of water entry or crossings.

5.8 Overhead powerlines and submarine cables

Locations must be assessed, and safe working areas established when near overhead power lines and submarine cables.

5.9 Safety while interacting with wildlife

5.9.1 Handling and interacting with wildlife

Procedures must be in place to minimise the risks associated with:

  • handling fish caught
  • possible dangerous aquatic creatures that are landed or encountered
  • handling, storage and collection of bait species.

5.9.2 Fauna and flora

Procedures should be in place to minimise the risks associated with local fauna and flora that may be encountered, caught or consumed.

Local fauna and flora that may need to be considered includes but is not limited to:

  • blue ring octopus
  • cone shells
  • crabs
  • crocodiles
  • dogs
  • eels
  • fish with dangerous body parts (e.g. spines, spikes, gill rakers, barbs, sharp teeth)
  • flora that stings (e.g. stinging nettle, etc.)
  • flora that cuts or punctures (e.g. thorns etc.)
  • inedible and toxic fish
  • insects (e.g. bees, leeches, sand flies, mosquitoes, wasps)
  • livestock (e.g. cattle, buffalo, etc.)
  • jellyfish (also known as marine stingers)
  • nesting birds
  • platypus
  • rats
  • seals
  • sharks
  • snakes
  • stingrays
  • stone fish.
5.10 Environmental sustainability procedures

5.10.1 Plan ahead and prepare

Planning ahead and preparing may include but is not limited to:

  • determining and observing current licensing and any special concerns of the planned fishing area
  • determining and observing species, size and possession limits or restrictions, tackle restrictions and local seasonal closures
  • seeking permits and/or permission where necessary
  • understanding life cycles and breeding seasons of relevant species
  • having appropriate tackle for the species, size and type of fish being sought
  • understand the participants objectives and abilities so activity planned protects the environment
  • plan the angling method used so it limits the impact on the environment
  • plan appropriate storage of bait and catch
  • consider available research and fisheries department guidance when determining sustainable angling practices
  • determining the presence and ways to reduce the impact on protected species
  • procedures listed in Core GPG – Environmental sustainability procedures.

5.10.2 Travel and stop on durable surfaces

Travelling in an area on durable surfaces may include but is not limited to:

  • using durable surfaces like rock, sand, gravel and manmade structures as angling sites
  • avoiding damage to fragile environments such as ocean and streamside vegetation, estuaries, seagrass, mangroves, corals and reefs
  • avoiding damage to agricultural land or assets
  • avoiding disturbing livestock
  • using established routes and paths
  • avoiding vegetated, soft or steep banks
  • using open grassed areas (e.g. sport fields), snag free water bodies and dummy plugs for skills assessments or casting practice
  • procedures listed in Core GPG – Environmental sustainability procedures.

5.10.3 Dispose of waste properly

Disposal of waste may include but is not limited to:

  • recover and dispose of tangled or snagged fishing line when safe to do so
  • removing any rubbish left behind by previous users where practicable
  • disposing of filleting waste appropriately in accordance with relevant area requirements
  • procedures listed in Core GPG – Environmental sustainability procedures.

5.10.4 Leave what you find

Leaving what you find may include but is not limited to:

  • washing down areas to clean them after they are used for filleting
  • considering the biodegradability of equipment used
  • using suitable locations and procedures to avoid getting snagged
  • unsnagging carefully to avoid breaking the line or damaging vegetation
  • using barbless hooks or circle hooks to improve fish release survival
  • using release weights for release of fish caught at depth to minimise barotrauma
  • consider the appropriateness of berley use, particularly in sensitive environments
  • avoiding damage to fisheries infrastructure in the water
  • avoiding damage to any infrastructure found
  • procedures listed in Core GPG – Environmental sustainability procedures.

5.10.5 Minimise the impact of fires

Minimise the impact of fires may include but is not limited to:

  • procedures listed in Core GPG – Environmental sustainability procedures.

5.10.6 Respect wildlife

Respecting wildlife may include but not limited to:

  • taking no more fish than for your immediate needs
  • following licensing and all species size and volume restrictions
  • using the appropriate tackle
  • targeting known sustainable fish species
  • planning for target species
  • using equipment appropriate to the target species
  • avoiding known spawning aggregations or protected species habitats
  • paying regular attention to gear and retrieving fish as quickly as possible
  • paying regular attention to the amount of the catch taken
  • paying regular attention to live bait
  • using appropriate style landing nets to minimise harm to fish while in the nets
  • once landed, fish are attended to immediately and not left to flop and flail around
  • removing hooks while the fish is in the water where possible and safe to do so
  • supporting the fish’s body while out of the water
  • avoiding holding a fish by the gills or eyes
  • avoiding placing live fish on extremely hot or cold surfaces
  • avoiding dropping fish on hard surfaces
  • covering the fish’s eyes with a soaking wet cloth
  • quickly and correctly return to the water unwanted, restricted, endangered or threatened species
  • catch records being based on measure, weight or photo with the aim of returning fish alive
  • carefully return unwanted live bait to the waters from where they were taken
  • when releasing fish using wet hands and keeping handling to a minimum
  • when releasing fish reviving tired or semi-conscious fish
  • limiting any disturbance to terrestrial or aquatic species that inhabit areas including:
    • avoiding bird nesting sites
    • avoiding seal and penguin colonies
    • avoiding turtle nesting sites
    • minimising artificial lighting on beaches where turtles are hatching
  • reporting all distressed, stranded or dead aquatic animals and protected species
  • using alternatives to live bait where possible
  • selecting sustainable sourced or manufactured baits, lures, berley and flies
  • ensuring suitable biosecurity measures are used to prevent cross contamination via bait and equipment
  • using of appropriate hooks for the target species to reduce bycatch, including catching undersize or protected fish
  • using of appropriate hooks which suit effective catch and release of the target species and/or likely bycatch species (e.g. barbless hooks or circle hooks)
  • taking steps to prevent birds and other terrestrial animals seeking fish, lures, flies or bait as food
  • limiting collection of bait species to prevent over collection
  • appropriately collecting, handling and storing bait species
  • taking steps to avoid deep hooking and/or cutting off the line when fish are deep hooked
  • using hooks which will rust out (i.e. avoid stainless hooks)
  • storing fish in ‘live wells’ or buckets for as short a time as possible
  • encouraging participants to follow more conservative species size and catch limits than the regulations
  • encouraging participants to be more conservative in their use of tackle and equipment than regulations
  • selecting appropriate locations and conditions when catch and releasing to improve the fish’s survival changes
  • restricting participant numbers to reduce overall catch in the area
  • minimising posed fish photography or being prepared to take photos of fish under the water
  • returning fish as close as possible to where they were caught and avoid translocating fish
  • ensuring any fish stocking undertaken complies with regulations
  • where possible, not feeding wildlife with bycatch
  • procedures listed in Core GPG – Environmental sustainability procedures.

5.10.7 Be considerate of your hosts and other visitors

Be considerate of your hosts and other visitors may include but is not limited to:

  • having a suitable distance from others to enable everyone a safe work area
  • seeking permission and confirming conditions or restrictions on tasks (e.g. rod holders, cutting, filleting etc.)
  • avoiding spooking fish being targeted by others
  • locating and using equipment so as not to block others access or create a hazard
  • avoiding locations while in frequent use by ferries and other commuter vessels
  • avoiding keeping large amounts of fish or using all of a limited bait resource
  • encouraging respectful behaviour towards others and the environment
  • procedures listed in Core GPG – Environmental sustainability procedures.


6 Equipment and logistics

6.1 Equipment requirements

6.1.1 General equipment

Angling equipment should be appropriate for the activity and in an appropriate condition.

Tackle should be appropriate for the type of species being sought and type of angling being undertaken.

Appropriate footwear should be worn.

Appropriate clothing and equipment should be worn that offers protection from:

  • the sun
  • bites and stings
  • environmental conditions.

Refer Appendix 2 Equipment for possible equipment to consider.

6.1.2 Lifejackets

This GPG does not cover angling from a watercraft (e.g. paddle-craft, motorboat, floating aid or device etc.). Follow marine safety agency requirements and guidance as well as an appropriate risk assessment for the use of lifejackets while angling on watercraft.

For lifejacket considerations while ocean facing rock fishing see section 6.1.4.1.

Lifejackets used must meet Australian marine safety requirements in the jurisdiction of operation.

The risk assessment must consider the use of lifejackets for situations where there is potential to fall into:

  • extremely cold water (e.g. alpine areas, etc.)
  • deep water
  • fast moving water
  • water from heights
  • water from an unstable or slippery surface.

Considerations for the use of lifejackets must include:

  • hazards and risks present
  • the likelihood of being in the water
  • the depth of the water
  • the difficulty in exiting the water
  • the water temperature
  • if wading is required and the types of obstacles to be overcome
  • the abilities of the participants
  • any clothing that might reduce buoyancy
  • the buoyancy provided by any personal thermal protection
  • the other buoyancy aids available
  • the rescue equipment available
  • the impact of fatigue over the length of the activity
  • the possibly of rapid water level rises or flooding.

6.1.3 Rescue equipment

Buoyancy aids and rescue equipment must be suitable for the task and activity.

The risk assessment must consider the need for buoyancy aids and rescue equipment.

Considerations for having buoyancy aids and rescue equipment available must include:

  • hazards and risks present
  • the likelihood of being in the water
  • the depth of the water
  • the difficulty in exiting the water
  • the water temperature
  • if wading is required and the types of obstacles to be overcome
  • the abilities of the participants
  • the possibly of rapid water level rises or flooding.

6.1.4 Ocean facing rock fishing equipment

6.1.4.1 Lifejackets for ocean facing rock fishing

While at an ocean facing rock fishing location, an appropriate lifejacket must be worn and correctly fitted.

Considerations relating to the type of lifejacket used while ocean facing rock fishing must include:

  • the design meets Australian marine safety requirements in the jurisdiction of operation
  • the design provides suitable buoyancy when in the water
  • if the design needs to allow the person in the water to be able to swim to avoid hazards (e.g. swim away from breaking waves or rocks)
  • if an inflatable design is suitable for the conditions and participants involved
  • if an inflatable design is used then whether it needs to automatically activate or can be manually activated (e.g. can swim away from breaking waves or rocks before inflating)
  • if a lifejacket is used as a direct part of an anchoring system to prevent being washed out to sea, that the design of the tether system includes a quick release harness system.

6.1.4.2 Other personal equipment for ocean facing rock fishing

While ocean facing rock fishing:

  • appropriate footwear must be worn that is suitable for maintaining grip on wet, sharp and/or slippery surfaces.
  • appropriate clothing must be worn as to not impede swimming ability if washed into water
  • clothing that should NOT be worn includes but is not limited to gumboots, waders and heavy jackets.

Consideration should be given as to if a helmet needs to be worn while ocean facing rock fishing.

Also refer Appendix 2 Equipment.

6.1.4.3 Fishing equipment for ocean facing rock fishing

Fishing systems and equipment must be suitable to ensure retrieval of fish is done safely. (For example, equipment is a suitable strength to lift fish outside of the wash zone or over lower ledges.)

6.1.4.4 Rescue equipment for ocean facing rock fishing

Rescue equipment for ocean facing rock fishing must include:

  • appropriate equipment for completing a throw rescue (see Appendix A2.3)
  • communication equipment appropriate for the type of venue to contact rescue authorities (see Appendix A2.2).

Rescue equipment for ocean facing rock fishing should include:

  • an additional buoyancy aid that can be thrown to the person in the water. Also see Appendix A2.4

6.1.4.5 Safety harness, line and anchor systems for ocean facing rock fishing

The risk assessment for each location used for ocean facing rock fishing must consider if a safety harness (e.g. a lifejacket with tether and quick release harness system), line and anchor system to prevent being washed out to sea should be used.

Considerations if a safety harness, line and anchor system is used to prevent being washed out to sea must include:

  • the safety harness is suitable for the purpose
  • the safety harness is correctly fitted
  • the anchor rope is capable of being adjusted to a suitable length
  • the anchor rope used is a suitable design and construction for the purpose
  • the connectors and knots used are suitable for the purpose
  • the anchor or anchors used are suitable to hold the expected force
  • having a suitable system ready to complete a rescue.

Also refer Appendix A2.4.

6.2 Use of equipment

6.2.1 General equipment use

All equipment should be used with reference to the manufacturers instructions.

All equipment should be appropriate for the task and correctly fitting.

Rigs should be appropriate to suit the target species and environment.

6.2.2 Lifejacket use

Procedures must ensure wearing an appropriate lifejacket occurs where it is required.

When used, lifejackets must be correctly sized and fitted.

6.2.3 Waders

Waders must be correctly fitted and enable appropriate freedom of movement.

Waders must not be used where there is a risk of the waders filling with water and impacting the wearers ability to move or keep their head above water.

Those using waders must be briefed on their use and any relevant emergency procedures.

Considerations while wearing waders should include:

  • additional thermal protection needed in cold environments
  • wearing a wading belt
  • using staffs or walking sticks while wading
  • wading boots
  • use of a lifejacket or other buoyancy aids
  • using polarised glasses to assist see the bottom.

Also refer considerations listed in section 5.7 Assessing water entry or crossings.

6.2.4 Hooks, flies and lures

Procedures to prevent injuries from hooks, flies and lures should include:

  • appropriate training on use, rigging and storage
  • not completing the rigging with hooks or lures until at the fishing location
  • rigged hooks or lures placed under the reel seat where the hook point is fully covered while carried
  • hook point placed into a cover (e.g. cork, hook cover, hook keeper) when rigged hooks or lures are carried
  • appropriate technique, location and spacing used while casting
  • considering flattened barbs wherever possible to permit easier extraction from the catch
  • appropriate training on landing and handling fish with exposed hooks
  • considering use of protective eyewear while fishing or working with hooks and lures
  • while baiting, casting and retrieving, the spacing and rod movement is away from other persons or animals
  • safe working areas being established during casting or landing fish
  • limiting or avoiding snags
  • appropriate training on detaching from snags and/or using lure retrievers.

6.2.5 Knifes

Procedures to prevent injuries from knifes should include:

  • assessment of the appropriateness of participants using a knife
  • appropriate training on use
  • considering using cut resistant safety gloves while using a knife during bait preparation and filleting fish
  • returning knifes to a scabbard after each use
  • using an appropriate cutting surface while using a knife
  • knife movement while cutting is away from the body of the knife holder
  • knife movement while cutting is away from other persons
  • other persons remaining an appropriate distance from the knife and knife user while being use
  • establish a safe working area when knifes are used
  • requiring no throwing of knifes even when in a scabbard
  • limiting the movement of those carrying a knife that is not in a scabbard.

Procedures to prevent injuries from knifes may include:

  • using scissors or similar for rigging preparation, cutting line or free release of un-landed fish
  • using knifes only for bait preparation and filleting.

6.2.6 Sinkers and shot

Procedures to prevent injuries from sinkers or shot should include:

  • appropriate training on use and casting techniques
  • appropriate location and spacing while casting
  • safe working areas being established during casting or landing fish
  • using a sinker size in balance with the overall rig and tackle outfit
  • using suitable knots when attaching to the line
  • considering use of protective eyewear
  • not placing sinkers or shot in the mouth
  • using pliers to crimp split shot.

6.2.7 Line

Procedures to prevent injuries from fishing line should include:

  • appropriate training on use
  • not wrap line around any part of the body (e.g. arm, hand, fingers, leg, foot, toes)
  • considering use of gloves or mittens while using hand reels
  • considering use of gloves or mittens while handling line under tension
  • using a suitable line and leader
  • safe working areas being established during casting or landing fish.

6.2.8 Rods and reels

Procedures to prevent injuries from rods and reels should include:

  • safe working areas being established during casting or landing fish
  • using suitable knots and terminal tackle to match the line, rod and reel
  • using suitable and correctly adjusted equipment for the target species
  • periodically checking during use the condition and adjustment of the line, reel, rod and rig.

6.2.9 Checking safety and rescue equipment

Prior to the activity, where relevant the following equipment must be checked that it is suitable and ready for use:

  • lifejackets
  • rescue equipment
  • any ocean facing rock fishing safety and rescue equipment that will be relied upon
  • where used all ocean facing rock fishing safety harness and line and anchor systems equipment
  • where applicable the EPIRB or Personal Locator Beacon (PLB)
  • first aid kit contents
  • where applicable the Automated External Defibrillator (AED).

6.3 Maintenance of equipment

Safety and rescue equipment must be appropriately maintained.

Angling equipment should be appropriately maintained.

Hooks that are rusty should not be used.

Equipment which is corroded or has exceeded its safe working life must be retired, marked and disposed of appropriately.

All equipment must be checked that it is serviceable before each activity or before being used including:

  • safety and rescue equipment
  • checking reel and drag mechanism operation
  • checking runners of rods for damage that may damage line.

Appropriate maintenance of relevant equipment to prevent corrosion should be undertaken before it is stored.

Equipment and inspection records must conform with any required law or regulation.

6.3 Maintenance of equipment

Safety and rescue equipment must be appropriately maintained.
Angling equipment should be appropriately maintained.
Hooks that are rusty should not be used.
Equipment which is corroded or has exceeded its safe working life must be retired, marked and disposed of appropriately.
All equipment must be checked that it is serviceable before each activity or before being used including:
• safety and rescue equipment
• checking reel and drag mechanism operation
• checking runners of rods for damage that may damage line.
Appropriate maintenance of relevant equipment to prevent corrosion should be undertaken before it is stored.
Equipment and inspection records must conform with any required law or regulation.

6.4 Storage of equipment

Activity equipment should be stored with reference to the manufacturer’s recommendations or instructions.
Considerations for storage of equipment may include but is not limited to:
• equipment is clean and dry
• the storage is free from harmful chemicals
• the storage is free from damp conditions
• the storage is free from environmental exposure including ultraviolet (UV) light and avoids extremes of temperature
• were appropriate the storage is in an appropriate liquid solution (e.g. soft plastic lures).


7 Leadership

7.1 Naming conventions

The activity leader naming convention enables this activity GPG to be related to Core GPG – Leadership requirements.

The leadership naming conventions for angling activities are:
• Fishing guide is equivalent to Leader in Core GPG
• “Activity leader” refers to a fishing guide.

7.2 Competencies

7.2.1 Competencies overview

The AAAS and Good Practice Guides refers to units from the Sport, Fitness and Recreation Training Package for descriptive statements of the knowledge and skills required of activity leaders.

The Training Package units are used for the sole purpose of providing descriptions for the knowledge and skills required. It is not intended to imply or require that specific formal training, assessment or qualification is the only means of gaining or recognising knowledge and skills.

Activity providers can recognise activity leaders as having the ‘ability to apply knowledge and skills to achieve expected results (i.e. competencies) in a number of different ways as per Recognition of Competence in Core GPG.

The Training Package units listed can be found by searching for the units on the training.gov.au/Home/Tga website. The code provided with the unit name assists in this search.

7.2.2 Activity leader competencies

Also refer to the Core GPG – Competencies.

Refer Appendix 4 Activity leader competencies for the recommended competencies fishing guides should have when leading angling.

Consider if water rescue competencies are required – as per section 7.7.9.

7.2.3 Recognition of competence

Refer to considerations for recognition pathways outlined in Core GPG – Recognition pathways.

7.3 Group size and supervision considerations

Considerations when determining the supervision ratio and group size for angling must include:

  • the type and location of the water body involved
  • characteristics of the site used to fish from
  • visibility (e.g. day, night, fog etc.)
  • if the site is ocean facing rock fishing
  • if wading or entry into water is involved or not
  • fall from height risks and management systems
  • the speed of the water flow
  • the size and strength of any wave action
  • weather and other environmental conditions
  • type of angling and target species
  • activity leaders competencies and familiarity with location
  • participants involved (see section 4.0 Participants)
  • the amount of instruction each participant requires
  • environmental impact
  • considerations in the Core GPG – Group size and Activity leader to participant ratios.
7.4 Angling recommended supervision

Appropriate supervision must be provided at all times during the activity.
The recommended supervision requirements for angling should not exceed:

Notes:

  • Refer section 7.3 above for considerations that may indicate an adjustment to the above supervision recommendations.
  • ^ Supervision for fly fishing is highly variable (e.g. casting clinics in controlled environments vs wading in moving water). An appropriate assessment needs to be undertaken to determine the appropriate level of supervision required for the specific activity context.
  • * = individual assessment of vulnerable participants capabilities is required (Also refer section 4.0 Participants above and the Core GPG – Vulnerable participants):
    • Additional supervision needs to be considered, including when there is only 1 guide the need for a responsible person to also attend
    • The supervision ratios provided assume where there is only 1 guide, a responsible person also attends (i.e. any group of minors or vulnerable participants will have as a minimum of either 1 guide and 1 responsible person or alternatively 2 guides)
    • The responsible person while able to provider general behavioural supervision they are considered a participant for determining supervision ratios (e.g. 1 guide with 7 participants and 1 responsible person = 1 guide to 8 participants).
  • # = for adults that are vulnerable participants, use the minors/vulnerable participants column and consider the * note above.
  • ^^ Consider the need for having a minimum of 2 guides while ocean facing rock fishing where participants are likely to require continual guide assistance with fishing technique or the risk assessment plan indicates a suitable competent lookout is needed. Lookouts must be competent in assessing wave risks.
  • The supervision of angling while using of watercraft is NOT covered in this GPG.
7.5 Activity briefings

7.5.1 Angling briefings

Before undertaking an activity, the information and requirements to be communicated may include but are not limited to:

  • location hazards and risks
  • level of difficulty
  • leader and participants casting/angling skills, level of training and previous experience
  • fitting clothing, equipment or personal protective equipment
  • relevant fishing regulations
  • group management procedures, etiquette, timing and outline of activity
  • water safety procedures
  • sun safety procedures
  • appropriate safe use, handling and care of hooks, lures, knives, rods, reels, sinkers and line
  • collection, care & presentation of bait
  • pre-casting checks and safe working area requirements
  • safe casting process and casting techniques
  • information about the target species and tips for catching it
  • features of the tackle to be used
  • how to rig and tie knots
  • techniques or procedures to reduce environmental impact
  • any relevant emergency response procedures (e.g. if they or anyone else falls or is washed into the water, if the sole activity leader is injured or incapacitate, etc.)
  • desired action imparted on the lure, fly or bait
  • how to approach fish/water to avoid spooking fish
  • line management and snag avoidance
  • what to do if snagged
  • explaining relevant angling terminology
  • feeling of bites, setting the hook and playing fish
  • landing, fish handling and releasing fish
  • fish species identification
  • dangerous aquatic creatures to consider
  • appropriate technique and rest breaks needed to reduce the risk of repetitive strain injury
  • appropriate wading techniques and use of waders
  • actions to take if washed or fall into the water, or someone else is washed or falls into the water
  • communications techniques
  • other angling and equipment use techniques to suit the location, type of fishing and associated equipment
  • any tetanus immunization requirements
  • avoiding contact with any allergens.

7.5.2 Ocean facing rock fishing briefings

Before undertaking an ocean facing rock fishing activity, the information and requirements to be communicated must include:

  • use of any relevant safety equipment
  • what to do if they are washed off the rock
  • what to do if someone else is washed off the rock
  • correct fitting and use of the lifejacket
  • the need to monitor wave patterns
  • other relevant items as listed in above section 7.5.1 Angling briefings above.
7.6 Activity site knowledge

The knowledge and experience of the activity site that activity leaders require before leading participants at that site, should be considered when allocating activity leader roles.

7.7 Activity management

7.7.1 Safe working area

Safe working distances must be established to prevent and/or minimize the hazard posed from overhead powerlines.

Safe working distances should be established to prevent and/or minimize accidental striking of anyone or entanglement with any structures (e.g. pipes, trees, bridges, fencing materials, cars, livestock, etc.) while using equipment.

Working areas should offer stable footing.

Moving about by running or jumping should be discouraged.

Working areas must have a suitable access and egress.

Procedures must manage any interaction with pedestrians, cyclists, vehicles and/or vessels to prevent injury to either party.

Land owner and/or land manager signage or instructions must be followed.

7.7.2 Falls from height

Working areas must be assessed for fall from height risks.

Working areas selected should minimise the risk from a fall from height.

7.7.3 Steep inclines

Steep inclines with slippery surfaces must be avoided or have procedures to help mitigate a potential fall.

Steep inclines should be avoided.

7.7.4 Slippery surfaces

Suitable non slip footwear must be worn if moving on slippery surfaces.

Slippery surfaces should be avoided or have procedures to help mitigate a potential fall.

Slippery surfaces exposed by recent drops in water levels (e.g. exposure of clay, mud or slippery rocks) should be avoided.

7.7.5 Water level changes and movements

7.7.5.1 General considerations

Locations with high banks that are undercut by water flow and/or wave action should be avoided.

Consideration should be given to the possible impact of boat wakes creating waves at the location.

Consideration should be given to the possible impact of waves at ocean facing locations.

7.7.5.2 Tides and swell

Tidal movements and water levels must be monitored.

The expected tide times and heights for the day of the activity should be known.

Locations where isolation or entrapment due to tides or other likely increases in water levels can occur should be avoided.

7.7.5.3 River level changes

River water levels and rainfall in the catchment area must be monitored.

7.7.5.4 Managed water releases

Water levels and water release timing must be monitored in areas subject to intermittent water release (e.g. dams, dam feed waterways, irrigation channels).

7.7.5.5 Flooding

Areas that are impacted by or in flood should be avoided.

7.7.6 Catching dangerous marine life

Monitoring must occur of catches as they are landed for dangerous marine life.

Creatures should be appropriately identified before handling.

Marine creature’s identification references should be carried.

Instruction should be provided in recognition of the various marine creatures including any dangerous characteristics and natural defence mechanisms.

7.7.7 Common injuries

Appropriate procedures must be in place:

  • to provide first aid for fishhook injuries and hook removal
  • regarding tetanus immunization requirements if fishhook injuries occur
  • to monitor for appropriate technique and rest taking breaks to reduce the risk of repetitive strain injury.

Also refer Core Good Practice Guide – First aid competencies.

7.7.8 Managing entry into water

Also see section 5.7 Assessing water entry or crossings.

7.7.8.1 Water entry general

Stability of the sites used to fish off must consider the potential for slipping or accidental falling into the water.

Entry into water must not occur unless an appropriate risk assessment and risk management plan has been implemented.

Considerations for the risk assessment for entry into water must include potential presence of dangerous animals.

Monitoring must occur for hypothermia in cold conditions or when wading.

7.7.8.2 Wading

Entry into water should not occur in areas likely to be inhabited by saltwater crocodiles.

Entry into water above the knees may need to be avoided in deep, cold or moving water and near river hazards.

Entry into water with strong tidal flow or tidal eddies must not occur.

Wading entry and exists must be planned to avoid hazards.

River hazards at the entry and exist site and downstream must be considered.

Correctly fitted and appropriate footwear should be worn when wading in water.

If worn, waders must be correctly fitted.

Wading activities should be reassessed in conditions with a low distance of visibility (e.g. fog, nights with no moonlight, heavy rain).

Consideration of additional safety procedures should occur where:

  • entry into the water is planned (e.g. rescue equipment, life jackets, swimming proficiency testing, etc.)
  • dangerous water conditions are involved (e.g. deep water, swift flowing water, rough water)
  • entering cold water
  • steep banks, overhanging or submerged vegetation or other structure that may entangle or entrap
  • submerged items (e.g. rocks, structures, damaged fencing and building materials).

7.7.8.3 Swimming

Swimming must not occur unless an appropriate risk assessment and risk management plan has been implemented and suitably competent activity leader(s) with appropriate rescue equipment are leading the swimming part of the activity.

Swimming should not be undertaken in angling locations where the angling activity is likely to attract dangerous animals.

Angling should not be undertaken in swimming locations where the angling activity is likely to attract dangerous animals.

7.7.9 Assessment of rescue competencies and equipment requirements

A risk assessment must determine the activity leader rescue competencies and rescue equipment requirements for the fishing site.

Also refer section 6.1.3 Rescue equipment and 6.1.4.4 Rescue equipment for ocean facing rock fishing.

7.7.10 Assessment of lifejacket and safety equipment requirements

A risk assessment must determine when a lifejacket needs to be worn.

Also refer section 6.1.2, section 6.1.4.1 and section 6.1.4.5.

7.7.11 Ocean facing rock fishing activity management

7.7.11.1 Conditions and working area

Ocean facing rock fishing must not occur in conditions with a low distance of visibility that limits monitoring waves (e.g. fog, nights with no moonlight, heavy rain).

Movement routes and working area selection must consider the hazards and risks associated with steep or slippery surfaces and associated vegetation.

Wave patterns must be observed prior to moving into the possible range of waves. Also see 5.1.6 Ocean facing rock fishing considerations.

Ongoing monitoring of waves and water levels must occur.

A suitable working distance must be established from breaking waves.

A suitable working area must be used that:

  • provides a view of the incoming waves
  • provides a means of escaping the area if a larger wave is identified
  • provides reasonable footing
  • does not have a fall from height risk.

Where a lookout is used, they must be competent in assessing wave risks. See 5.1.6 Ocean facing rock fishing considerations.

7.7.11.2 Safety harness and line and anchor systems

Refer 7.7.11.1 above requirements for ocean facing rock fishing.

Safety lines must be at a suitable length:

  • to remove excess slack so that in the event of being washed in the person is not dragged too far down the rock
  • not allow the person to move or be dragged into a position that they are unable to readily climb back to a safe position.

7.7.12 Fly fishing

Hats and glasses must be worn while fly casting with hooks.

Where there is entry into water also see: 5.7 Assessing water entry or crossings, 6.2.3 Waders and 7.7.8 Managing entry into water.

7.7.13 Beach and surf

Entry into water either above knee depth or where heavy surf or swell is apparent should not occur.

Entry into water where sharks may be attracted by the angling activity should not occur.

Long sleeve shirts and long pants should be worn when marine stingers are likely to be present.

Changes to sand banks and gutters during the activity should be monitored.

Where there is entry into water also see: 5.7 Assessing water entry or crossings, 6.2.3 Waders and 7.7.8 Managing entry into water.

7.7.14 Exposed and shallow reefs and sandbars

Working areas should provide stable footing.

Working areas and routes should not occur on fragile surfaces. (Also see 5.10.2 Travel and stop on durable surfaces.)

Working areas and routes should consider wave, swell, tide and water movements to prevent being washed off the reef or sand bar. (Also see 7.7.11 Ocean facing rock fishing activity management.)

Procedures must be used to avoid cuts from the reef.

7.7.15 Estuaries and mud flats

Footwear must be appropriately secured to prevent loss.

Locations where isolation or entrapment due to tides can occur should be avoided.

Suitable routes should be used to minimise the possibility of becoming stuck in deep mud or silt.

7.7.16 Wharfs, pontoons and jetties

Working areas must be within any safety barriers if installed.

Areas under where casting occurs or objects are being passed, thrown or dropped from height should be avoided.

Disused or privately constructed pontoons and jetties should be assessed for structural safety before use.

7.7.17 Bridges

Working areas must be within any safety barriers if installed.

Areas under where casting occurs or objects are being passed, thrown or dropped from height should be avoided.

Disused or privately constructed bridges should be assessed for structural safety before use.

7.7.18 Rivers and waterholes

Movement routes and working area selection must consider the hazards and risks associated with steep or slippery surfaces and associated vegetation.

Procedures should be used to ensure participants do not becoming separated from the group.

Where there is entry into water also see: 5.7 Assessing water entry or crossings, 6.2.3 Waders and 7.7.8 Managing entry into water.

7.7.19 Dams and impoundments

Water levels and water release timing must be monitored in areas subject to intermittent water release from dams.

Movement routes and working area selection must consider the hazards and risks associated with steep or slippery surfaces and associated vegetation.

Where there is entry into water also see: 5.7 Assessing water entry or crossings, 6.2.3 Waders and 7.7.8 Managing entry into water.

7.7.20 Irrigation channels

Water levels and water release timing must be monitored in areas subject to intermittent water release.

Movement routes and working area selection must consider the hazards and risks associated with steep or slippery surfaces and associated vegetation.

Irrigation channels should not be entered as water levels can change rapidly without warning.

7.7.21 Alpine waters/areas

Monitoring must occur for hypothermia in cold conditions or when wading in cold waters.

Appropriate thermal protection must be worn.

Where there is entry into water also see: 5.7 Assessing water entry or crossings, 6.2.3 Waders and 7.7.8 Managing entry into water.

Also refer to the Core Good Practice Guide – Recognition of competencies.


Glossary

Glossary

AAAS: Australian Adventure Activity Standard – See Preface for details.
Alpine waters: bodies of water in an areas where snow falls in winter and may settle on the ground for periods of time. Some states (or territories) may have a state-based definition or lists of what constitutes alpine waters under local jurisdiction. Alpine waters may be subject to special water safety regulations. The temperature of water and air in alpine locations can be extremely cold at any time of year.
Angling: a method of fishing using a hook and line.
Berley: fish bait scattered on the water. (Also spelt burley).
Burley: See berley.
Bushwalking: walking in natural areas.
Camping: the use of a temporary site for overnight camping.
Casting: The action of propelling an object attached to a line or rod for fishing. For example a hook, lure or fly being propelled out into the water.
Competence: ability to apply knowledge and skills to achieve expected results.
Competent person: someone who has the competence to perform specific functions.
Flash Flooding: is flooding in a localised area with a rapid onset, usually as the result of relatively short intense bursts of rainfall.
Fly fishing: a method of angling which uses a rod and weighted line to cast an unweighted or lightly weighted hook which has been dressed so it look similar to a water creature or insect in/on the water.
Hook: an objected attached to a fishing line used to catch fish. A hook may be part of a fly or lure.
GPGs: Good Practice Guide(s) – See Preface for details
Land manager: the party that has legal responsibility for managing a particular environment. This may include the power to restrict access or place conditions and/or requirements on anyone accessing that particular environment. Includes managers of rivers, waterways and other bodies of water (also see land owner). Note that is may differ from the marine safety agency. The requirements of both the land manager and the marine safety agency need to be considered.
Land owner: the party that owns and has legal responsibility for managing a particular environment (also see land manager).
Lifejacket: a worn device that provides the wearer with additional buoyancy in water. (Also known as Personal floatation device (PFD))
Marine safety agency: the statutory organisation that regulates the safety of watercraft and their operations, in the jurisdiction the activity is conducted.
Minor: someone under the age of 18 years.
Ocean facing rock fishing: (also known as rock fishing) angling from rock ledges, submerged rocks, rock faces and rocks that go into the water and may be subject to wave action and/or inundation.
Responsible person: a competent person who is able to complete delegated elements or tasks during an activity that does not require the activity-specific competence of a leader or assistant leader.
River hazard(s): a hazard created by a watercourse’s geology and flora, the water within it or a combination of both. Common river hazards include but is not limited to: level of aeration of the water, drops, entrapment points, fast flowing water, floating objects, undercut rocks, re-circulations, rapids, sieves, strainers, submerged objects etc.
Rock fishing: common term for ocean facing rock fishing. As ‘fishing from rocks’ can also occur in a range of environments with different hazards and risks, ocean facing rock fishing is used in this GPG to distinguish the different environments.
Supervision ratio: the number of participants that an activity leader may supervision, expressed as a ratio. For example, the ratio 10:1 means 10 participants to 1 activity leader.
Throw-bag: a rescue device with a length of rope in a bag, designed so the rope can pay out when the bag is thrown to a swimmer. A throw-bag is standard rescue equipment for many aquatic activities e.g. kayaking, river recreational activities & pool life guarding.
Trigger point: a particular circumstance or situation that causes an action to occur.
Wash zone: The area in which wave action may impact.
Also refer terms and definitions from Core GPG – Glossary.

Also refer to the Core Good Practice Guide – Glossary.


Appendices

Appendix 1 Weather information

Information as at 27 May 2019.

A1.1 Warnings

The following table details the:

  • current Australian weather warnings
  • associated weather for each warning
  • mainland warning trigger points for issuing warnings for strong winds and hail.

Bureau of Meteorology weather warnings and associated weather table:

The Bureau of Meteorology also issues a range of other potentially relevant warnings including:
• bushwalkers weather alert (currently part of Tasmania only)
• fire weather warning
• flood watch and warning
• tsunami: watch and warning
• tropical cyclone: watch and warning.

A1.2 Additional information

The Bureau of Meteorology also provides a range of services – see the following for details

Appendix 2 Equipment

A2.1 Angling equipment

The equipment required and the appropriate “type” of equipment used is dependent on the specific context of the activity.

Angling equipment

Equipment used for angling may include but is not limited to:

  • rod
  • reel
  • appropriate fishing line and leader material/trace
  • appropriate tackle for the type of species
  • tackle box
  • container for caught fish (e.g. bucket, esky, live well)
  • landing net to assist in landing caught fish
  • scissors/clippers/nail cutters for completing rigging
  • forceps/fishhook remover
  • knot tying aids
  • stomach content scoop
  • priest
  • vest for carrying “everything”
  • dressings
  • knife in a scabbard or appropriate storage
  • cutting board
  • gauge or ruler to determine fish size
  • means of collecting rubbish for disposal
  • cut resistant safety glove(s) for cutting and filleting
  • protective gloves for handling line or fish
  • waders
  • wading boots/neoprene wading socks
  • wading stick
  • protective eyewear (e.g. polarised sunglasses)
  • cord or rope (e.g. to lower buckets into the water)
  • light or torch.


Repair equipment

Repair equipment may include but is not limited to:

  • pliers or multi-tool
  • tape
  • wader repair kit
  • glue.

A2.2 Communication equipment

Communications equipment may include but is not limited to:

  • emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB)
  • mobile phone
  • personal locator beacon (PLB)
  • satellite phone/communicator
  • signalling mirror
  • two-way radio (marine or UHF as appropriate).

A2.3 Rescue equipment

Rescue equipment may include:

A2.4 Ocean facing rock fishing equipment

Safety equipment – ocean facing rock fishing

Safety equipment for ocean facing rock fishing must include:

  • appropriate footwear suitable for walking on wet rock
  • appropriate lifejacket (refer Australian marine safety requirements in the jurisdiction of operation and consideration in the equipment section).

Safety equipment for ocean facing rock fishing may include:

  • an appropriate helmet.

Safety harness and line and anchor systems – ocean facing rock fishing

Safety equipment for safety harness and line and anchor systems while ocean facing rock fishing may include:

  • an appropriate harness or a lifejacket with tether and quick release harness system
  • appropriate designed and made rope
  • appropriate connectors (e.g. rock climbing screwgate carabiners)
  • appropriate anchors.

For detailed information relating to rope safety systems and equipment (e.g. anchors, connectors, harnesses, rope etc.) can be found in the Abseiling and Climbing GPG.

Rescue equipment – ocean facing rock fishing

Rescue equipment for ocean facing rock fishing must include:

  • appropriate equipment for completing a throw rescue
  • communication equipment appropriate for the type of venue to contact rescue authorities (see below).

Rescue equipment for ocean facing rock fishing should include:

  • an additional buoyancy aid that can be thrown to the person in the water.

Additional rescue equipment for ocean facing rock fishing may include:

  • life-ring buoyancy aid
  • buoyancy aid with rope attached
  • a throw-bag.

A2.5 Emergency equipment

Emergency equipment may include but is not limited to:

  • section A2.2 above
  • 6.1.3 Rescue equipment and items listed in section A2.3 above).

A2.6 Personal equipment

Activity Leader

Activity leader equipment may include but is not limited to:

  • communications equipment (standard communication rather than emergency communication where this differs) and spare batteries or backup “power banks”
  • relevant site maps and navigation information
  • pen/pencil and blank writing paper
  • watch or equipment suitable to tell and measure time for first aid purposes
  • a waterproof method of storing and carrying maps and navigation information
  • compass and/or other navigation aids (e.g. GPS)
  • head torch and spare batteries
  • polarised sunglasses
  • equipment as per for participant.

Participant

Participant equipment may include but is not limited to:

  • appropriate clothing for the conditions
  • footwear suitable for the conditions
  • personal medications (including for asthma and anaphylaxis)
  • prescription glasses
  • personal hygiene requirements
  • sun hat
  • sunglasses (e.g. polarise sunglasses)
  • raincoat suitable for the environment
  • head torch
  • waders.

Group

Group equipment may include but is not limited to:

  • hand sanitiser
  • sunscreen
  • insect repellent
  • appropriate toileting equipment
  • toilet paper.

A2.7 Other equipment

Were the activity involves watercraft, refer to the relevant watercraft or marine safety requirements for equipment. (Refer Appendix 3 Watercraft use information sources for additional information.)

Were the activity involves bushwalking to get to the site, then refer to the Bushwalking GPG for equipment to consider.

Were the activity involves camping, refer to the Camping GPG for equipment to consider.

Appendix 3 Watercraft use information sources

This good practice guide does not cover the hazards and risks associated with use of watercraft (e.g. paddle-craft, motorboat, sailing boat, etc.) while angling.

When using watercraft as a part of angling, reference needs to occur to:

  • the appropriate marine safety agency regulation and/or requirements and
  • any relevant “standards”, “requirements” or “good practice guides” for using the type of watercraft involved.

Relevant information may include:

  • the appropriate marine safety agency regulation or requirements for ‘hire’, ‘charter’, ‘commercial’ or ‘other general’ watercraft use (e.g. Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA), local marine safety agencies)
  • local land managers requirements (e.g. harbour masters in port jurisdictions, marine national parks authorities, marine sanctuary authorities, local waterway managers.)
  • for inland water paddle-craft, the Inland water paddle-craft GPG
  • for enclosed and coastal waters paddle-craft, the Enclosed and coastal waters paddle-craft GPG
  • appropriate associations (e.g. charter operation, gaming fishing, fishing guide and instructors, boat operation).
Appendix 4 Activity leader competencies

Also refer to competencies section in Core GPG – Competencies.
Fishing guides should have the following competencies or the equivalent:

Rescue competencies

The activity provider must determine if there is a need for fishing guides to hold water rescue competencies or water skills competencies. Subject to a risk assessment, fishing guides may need water rescue competencies such as: